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b2ap3_thumbnail_The-buffet-table.gifb2ap3_thumbnail_Enjoying-the-food-and-each-others-company.gifThis past weekend was thanksgiving back home in Canada. One might think that this would make a wayward Canuck passing the holiday thousands of miles away in Northern Ghana a little homesick; missing a nice home-cooked meal, enjoying the company of family and friends, fall leaves crunching under foot. But nothing could be further from the truth.

This past weekend was filled with all of those things – minus the crunchy fall leaves part. The expat community here in Tamale rolled up their sleeves and cooked, baked and basted their way to faithfully recreating a North American holiday tradition in the heart of West Africa.

There was squash, mashed potatoes, carrot, rice and eggplant dishes, tilapia, salad, couscous, green beans, and of course turkey and stuffing. Dessert included 4 pumpkin pies (made with local squash I am told, although surprisingly indistinguishable from the pumpkin version) apple crisp, chocolate cake, and lots of ice cream.

The celebration wasn't confined to Canadians, but included Ghanaians, Danes, French, British, Americans, Nigerians, Dutch, Swedes and others - around 50 or 60 people in total. For some – probably a majority there – this was their first experience with this holiday, and I am sure it left an indelible and positive impression.

Sitting along two long tables in the still hot and humid evening, people from all over the world sat and talked, shared their backgrounds, their aspirations, their stories. I met people from everywhere, but was able to connect quickly and meaningfully to all of them. Indeed Tamale seems to attract similarly outward looking, engaged, and thoughtful people.

For me the most beautiful aspect of this is that we Canadians were able to share a part of our culture with people from across the globe, and that everyone took part with enthusiasm and zeal and came out with stronger ties to one another. It is my hope that I will be able to take part in many things that are uniquely Ghanaian during my stay, and similarly strengthen my ties with people in the communities I will be working with here.

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Oktoberfest-in-Ethiopia.gifThanksgiving weekend...usually a time I would get together with family and stuff my face with way to much turkey, resulting in a comatose state for the next 24 hours. However, this year's Canadian Thanksgiving was a little different and ended up being two polar extremes – as you can probably figure out, it concluded in a not so festive fashion.

It started out great, and rather unexpected. As many of my fellow Waterlooers and German friends know, around this time of year, Oktoberfest happens. Oktoberfest is basically a German event focused celebrating German food, music and culture. Being in Waterloo for my undergrad years, which has a huge population of Germans, allowed me to become quite acquainted with this annual celebration.

It did not even cross our minds that Oktoberfest would be celebrated here, in Addis of all places! But low and behold, we found out that the Hilton Hotel was organizing an Oktoberfest event on the weekend! Who would have thought?

After running around trying to find last minute tickets, we made it. I was ecstatic – it reminded me of being back in Waterloo again. The Hilton set up at tent in the back of the hotel and had different types of vendors, a huge Oktoberfest themed buffet (sausages, pretzels, the works!) and even had a German Polka band! We met up with some friends, enjoyed the event and even danced with some Austrian diplomats till the early hours.

Sunday was pretty uneventful, but I cannot say the same for Thanksgiving Monday. My roommate Clara had been pretty weak and out of sorts for a couple days so when she started having pain and could barely stand up, we got worried. On Monday, I left work early to take her to the hospital with Ferkadu. First we went to a Swedish clinic specifically for expats and after several lab tests and hundreds of US dollars later, they still could not figure out what was wrong. To rule out appendix, they sent us to an imaging centre all the way across town to get an ultrasound as they are a very small clinic. After a couple hours, we found out it was not appendix but they still could not figure out what was wrong so we went back to the clinic for further tests. Due to some questionable blood results, the doctors sent us to the Korean Hospital for further investigation. The Korean Hospital is known to be a relatively reputable hospital that many people go to, but it was in the next town over, just outside of Addis. Keep in mind we had been on this quest for already 4 hours and poor Clara was barely surviving.

This is where I want to talk a bit about the underdevelopments of Ethiopia's transportation system. There is road construction everywhere and no traffic lights. This can easily make a 30-minute commute a couple of hours, especially at night. After being in bumper to bumper traffic for an hour and a half, we get to the hospital. The Korean Hospital is a large hospital that was built by the South Koreans around 20 or so years ago. Even though it is considered one of the better ones, we were not impressed. Not only had the doctor we were supposed to see already left for the day, but poor Clara had to go through all the lab tests again and then we waited for the results for another 4 or so hours. I was terrified that Clara had to do a procedure there. I tried to keep in mind that this is a developing country, but when I saw ill people waiting around for hours and in less than acceptable sanitary conditions, I was terrified.

Several hours later we got the test results (finally!). It was just a bad infection and they sent Clara home with antibiotics. I was thankful that it was nothing serious and Ferkadu drove us home (he stayed with for the entire time!). It was 11 pm by the time we got home, making it 8 hours and countless miles just to find a diagnosis.

I have waited longer for medical assistance in a Canadian hospital but just seeing the conditions of the medical facilities, spending hundreds of dollars and driving around Addis for different tests, makes me NEVER want to get sick here. I never thought I would say this but thank goodness for Canadian healthcare.

Regardless, Clara got the help she needed. I know it could have been much, much worse. Even though this Thanksgiving turned out to be less than ideal, I am thankful. I am thankful for the amazing friends we met and had a great time with them weekend. I am also eternally grateful for all our amazing MEDA colleagues that helped us make sure that Clara got help on Monday. Ethiopia has its ups and downs, just like any other country (healthcare being a major downfall), but having a support system definitely softens the blow.

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Homemade-Red-Red.gifb2ap3_thumbnail_With-my-roommate-Mette.gifThese are some of my favorite things.

I'm happy to report that these past couple of weeks, I've finally been settling in. After almost a month of searching, I finally found an awesome roommate and a safe apartment. A little two bedroom off a main road with electricity, running water and even has AC (pretty fancy!).

I've been taking full advantage of having a kitchen again. Traditional Ghanaian food is not very vegetarian friendly; most dishes have meat, so it can be challenging finding something veggie on the menu when you're eating out. I must say, one of my favorite traditional dishes is "red red" and luckily vegetarian! It's fried plantains with beans (and veggies when I make it at home, which makes it even better!).

b2ap3_thumbnail_On-one-of-my-morning-runs.gifOur neighborhood is nice and quiet, with lots of rural roads nearby that are prefect for peaceful trail runs. I've even formed a little running group with my roommate and another girl nearby. Morning runs are one of my absolute favorite things here. The sun is just rising and it's still cool enough to run, plus you I get to watch the whole world wake up. Usually we just encounter goats and chickens on the roads with the occasional motorbike or women carrying a load on her head, passing by. Then on the way back on our loop, we are greeted by eager, smiling children in their uniforms walking and riding bikes to school. They're always enthusiastically waving and yelling "hello salaminga (foreigner)" on top of their lungs. You can't help but smile, wave, and repeat, "hello" back to them as many times as they say it to us.

On days that we don't run, my roommate and I have started doing yoga together in our living room. I was pretty excited when we found yoga mats at the grocery store. With large windows that overlook the main road, we get some beautiful views in the morning. It's been a great way to get centered before diving into a busy day at the office.

It's been a few busy weeks for the GROW project and my internship. Last week, our first press release for the new soy processing plant was published and we also launched our Facebook and Twitter sites. (Don't forget to like and follow us!) We've been moving at a very fast pace, but it's been a lot of fun and I'm learning constantly- and getting to know my amazing coworkers better, is just another bonus! Speaking of them, I'd like to give a shout to all of the wonderful people I've met here that have welcomed me and supported me. My boss and coworkers, who have helped me get settled in: From fixing things in the apartment, to taking me on errands, getting us a security guard and much more- they've been there for me very step of the way. I've also been fortunate to meet some awesome expats that have provided helpful advice and shown me the magical cheese and yoghurt shop! I'm truly grateful to be surrounded by some many lovely people, thank you.

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b2ap3_thumbnail_An-intricate-weaving-design-that-one-of-E-FACEs-youth-is-working-on.gifI had the pleasant surprise of being able to join our team on today's site visits, which included various interventions such as: Business Owners (BOs) and Village Savings and Loan Association (VSLA), Technical and Vocational Education Training (TVET), and Building Skills for Life. The day started out driving across the city to an area called Shiro Meda where we visited the first intervention of BOs and VSLA. The youth representatives seemed to get a kick out of seeing me there – I'm guessing they weren't expecting me to be there. While I didn't understand most of the conversations, my colleague, Tsedey translated what one of the youth shared: she spoke about the valuable lessons and training received in the area of saving. Through their weekly savings, the youth gain capacity to purchase their own notebooks – something I wouldn't even have to think twice about back at home.

Our second visit was to a TVET site, where youth received training at a hair salon school. When I entered the building, the youth were busy working away at doing people's hair. It was interesting to see a fair amount of males receiving this training, whereas at most hair schools in Canada, the students are mostly female.

My highlight of the entire day was the last site. We drove down a very bumpy road to a government work space, where youth participants in the Building Skills for Life program were working with weaving looms. Building Skills for Life targets young workers (ages 14-17) and provides them with practical education and training, so that the youth can be empowered to create opportunities for themselves. The program also includes technical training on traditional weaving, which is what I was able to see for myself through the visit. The youth seemed pretty shy as I went around with my camera, but once I started getting a few shots, some of the youth seemed to be alright with me taking pictures of their work. Some of the pieces were very intricate, and it amazes me that they learn and develop these skills in order to make a living for themselves at such a young age.

I'm thankful I had the opportunity to join today's site visits. It really brought the past few weeks of what I've been working on in the office to life. It's one thing when you see E-FACE numbers, reports, and documents. It was refreshing to see the clients and get a better understanding of how this project is really impacting lives, especially those in the textile industry. Of course I still have so much to learn and grasp about the project and overall child labor in Ethiopia (especially in traditional weaving), which makes me even more eager to get out into the field and to the sites.

In the future, I'll be traveling to Arba Minch to see E-FACE's field work and interventions. I'm really excited to see a different part of Ethiopia, and look forward to meeting more clients.

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It's been already a month since arriving for my 6-month internship with MEDA Ethiopia. Times flies by! The past month has mainly consisted of adjusting. Adjusting to the climate, adjusting to daily living habits (using bottled water for everything, sanitizing produce, expecting unexpected power outages, and the list goes on), and adjusting to a new work environment and culture. Overall, I am enjoying life in Addis and am looking forward to getting to know the people and city over the next 5 months.

A few things I've been able to do over the past month have included...

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  • City Tour: It was great to see more of Addis a few weeks ago. We saw different parts of the city (mainly from the car), but got to see a nice city view from Entoto Mountain, and visited Lucy at the National Museum. Addis is a pretty big city, compared to where I'm from (Waterloo, ON). But it's not as overwhelming as somewhere like Seoul, South Korea. I have yet to ride a 'blue donkey' (16-passenger vans) or they call them taxis, but am hoping to soon. They're way cheaper than cabs, but obviously less comfortable. I used to ride them all the time when I spent 2 months in Uganda (they call them matatoo), so I'm guessing it's pretty much the same thing here. That way, I feel like I'll get to know the city more, if I get familiar with local transportation.

  • Traditional Dancing: Jillian from HQ was in Addis for a few weeks, so Steph and I had the chance to go to Yod Abyssinia for Ethiopian traditional dancing and food. It was a fun night! I got pulled up on stage to dance, and while dancing isn't my forte, I gave it a shot. My brother is an amazing dancer (he dances competitively), so I did it for him. He would have been proud! The dance moves weren't too difficult, but I still probably looked so bad compared to the Ethiopian dancers.

  • b2ap3_thumbnail_Everyone-has-their-wicks-lit-and-the-entire-square-is-lit-up-for-Meskel.gifMeskel: It was Meskel a few weeks ago. 'Meskel' means cross in Amharic, or the holiday is also known as 'Finding the True Cross'. Steph and I went to Meskel Square with our colleague, Wondwossen. There were thousands and thousands of people there. It was quite the experience. We managed to find a place to stand at the way back, and heard several people speak, along with many songs. Once it was dusk, people started lighting these little wicks. It was really amazing how the place just lit up so fast! And after much anticipation, the huge tower of wood and grass, was lit on fire. We waited about 2 hours for it to finally happen. Everyone was singing and cheering once it was lit, and there were fireworks too! Leaving the ceremony... was crazy though! We were squished in a sea of people, and eventually managed to get out. For the rest of the night on our way home, you could see and hear people celebrating in their neighborhoods.

Life in Addis is really starting to grow on me. Since I don't have that much time here, I want to do more exploring. Already, we've been to Bole a few times, checked out Piazza for shopping and the Stadium for great leather. In the midst of poverty/begging being very in your face, there are things that make me laugh and remind me of why I'm here. Whether it's the smiles and laughs of little kids when I wave, or when people are pleased to hear I'm Korean (Ethiopia and Korea are friends – I just learned recently that Ethiopia sent troops to South Korea's aid during the Korean War), or getting to know my colleagues at the office, these are all things that make it fun and rewarding to be here. I definitely feel like the next 5 months are going to fly by, so I don't want to waste any time!

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