MEDA Blog - Stories from the Field

Jennifer Denomy is MEDA’s Technical Director of Vulnerable Populations, which includes a focus on women, youth and rural populations. She is based in MEDA’s West Africa, Middle East and North Africa (MENA) regional team.

In this role, she develops and leads MEDA's strategy to promote increased economic inclusion for vulnerable populations.  She has expertise in incorporating women and youth into markets, supporting entrepreneurship, promoting financial inclusion and providing training and facilitation. She brings experience in financial inclusion and livelihoods programming in Egypt, Morocco, Uganda, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, El Salvador, Mongolia and Afghanistan. From 2009 to 2012, she was facilitator of the SEEP Network’s Youth Financial Services Practitioner Learning Program, a three year action research project that brought together four microfinance organizations to explore appropriate and accessible financial services for young people. A trained facilitator and curriculum designer, she has twenty years’ experience conducting tailored workshops, training trainers and creating training materials. Prior to joining MEDA, Jennifer worked as the pedagogical manager of a teacher training centre in Germany and a curriculum designer for BRAC’s Non-formal Primary Education Program in Bangladesh.  Jennifer holds a Master's degree in Education and International Development from the University of Toronto and an M.A in English Language and Literature from McGill University. 

Business for Good: Women-led Social Enterprises in Africa and the Middle East

Traditional Maasai Beaded Jewelry, Sidai Designs, TanzaniaTraditional Maasai Beaded Jewelry, Sidai Designs, Tanzani
What is a Social Enterprise?

A social enterprise is an organization with two primary and interlinked goals: to generate revenue, and to achieve positive social or environmental outcomes. In attempting to balance profit generation with social goals, a social enterprise straddles the private and volunteer sectors.1
Continue reading
1303 Hits

Supporting Women-run Social Enterprises: Helping Entrepreneurs to Help their Communities

Morocco show pic
Jacqueline Burge
Jennifer Mulli
Errtaj 2
Errtaj 4
When is a trade fair more than a trade fair?

In September, Trade + Impact held its first Summit in Morocco, bringing together women-run social enterprises, international buyers and potential investors. The Summit featured products from two key sectors: handicrafts and agribusiness for cosmetics. These sectors were chosen because they employ significant numbers of women, and additionally, have huge growth potential. Markets for each of the sectors are estimated at USD 30 billion, and global demand is growing.

Like many sectors, handicrafts and natural cosmetics face significant barriers to profitability and growth. Structural barriers, such as tariffs and taxes on inter-African trade, present challenges. Reliability of shipping and transportation cause delays in deliveries and increased costs. In addition, these sectors are very fragmented, with large numbers of small producers working in relative isolation. Access to materials is an ongoing challenge, particularly sustainable materials. Producers working in handicrafts and cosmetics face challenges in accessing financing, and very few of those attending the Summit had ever accessed a loan, outside of money borrowed from friends or family members.

Continue reading
1247 Hits

What can we learn from Project Evaluations? MEDA Shares Results of Impact Evaluation

IE1
EI2
EI3
EI4

From 2008 to 2014, MEDA implemented the YouthInvest project in Morocco and Egypt.  During that time, we reached over 63,000 youth with financial and non-financial services, and built the capacity of our partner staff to provide skills training and financial products to youth.

But this is not the whole story.

Continue reading
1223 Hits

Announcing findings from YouthInvest

There are approximately 1.3 billion young people in the world between the ages of 15 and 24, and one in five live in Africa. This is the largest cohort of youth the world has ever seen. To be a force for positive change, these young people need opportunities that will help them thrive - access to training, education, jobs and financial services. And yet, youth are three times more likely to be unemployed than adults. They also are 33% less likely to have a bank account, and 40% less likely to have saved formally than adults. MEDA is supporting young people around the world with increased access to sustainable economic opportunities.
Continue reading
1179 Hits

Approach with Humility: Reflections for International Development Week

Nina Munk WUSC
Uganda

I had the great privilege of seeing writer and journalist Nina Munk deliver a keynote address at the recent International Forum, put on by WUSC and CECI. I’d read her book – The Idealist – last year and found it very thought provoking, and – perhaps surprisingly, for a book on foreign aid – a genuine page-turner.

Nina Munk delivers keynote address at the WUSC - CECI International Forum

Continue reading
878 Hits

MEDA's Evolving Approach to Youth Financial Inclusion

Al Amana client traditional shoemaker
ARDI Client Carpenter

On Friday January 22, MEDA is very pleased to be participating in the International Forum, hosted by WUSC and CECI. The theme of the forum is ‘Inclusive Economies, Inclusive Societies: Collaborative Action for Youth and Women.’ We will be presenting a case study on our approach to financial inclusion for youth. This blog gives a preview of what we will be discussing at the event. Hope to see you there!

What is financial inclusion and why is it important?

Financial inclusion means having access to a range of suitable, affordable services, including savings (formal and informal), loans and financial education. Access to youth-appropriate savings and loan products helps young people plan for their future. Youth-friendly financial services can lead to many positive outcomes, including heightened ability to manage money, build assets and improved opportunities for entrepreneurship. And yet, less than 5% of youth (ages 15-24) worldwide are currently being reached by financial services.

Continue reading
1033 Hits

Cautious Optimism – Youth Unemployment and Global Entrepreneurship Week 2015

EFACE Client
Jens Blog image
Background

Those of us working in youth economic opportunities have been reading about the increasingly alarming statistics on youth unemployment and underemployment. The headlines talk about the “global unemployment crisis facing youth” and articles warn of the “tsunami of youth unemployment” and its “scarring” effects. (1) Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi once told European trade leaders “Youth unemployment is a time bomb.” (2) Is this exaggeration or an appropriate forecast of what’s to come? Here are some facts: 

75 million young people in the developing world are unemployed and hundreds of millions more are underemployedEvery year, 20 million young people enter the labour force in Africa and Asia alone In the Middle East and North Africa, 80 percent of young workers work in the informal sector Youth are three times more likely than adults to be unemployedOne in four young people cannot find work for more than US$1.25 a day. (3)

Yet global economic growth and poverty reduction over the next 15 years will have to be driven by today’s youth. How do we address these staggering numbers to support this population bulge in becoming economic drivers of success for tomorrow?

Continue reading
2541 Hits

The Role of Parents and Families in Youth Financial Inclusion

The United Nations Population Fund reports that there are 1.8 billion young people between the ages of 10 and 24, with 89 percent of them residing in less-developed countries (2014). With appropriate knowledge and tools, youth can be financially empowered to access economic opportunities in a sustainable manner. Although they represent a large potential market, the integration of youth into the formal financial system is still a relatively new concept in many countries. In order to address these operational issues and explore innovations in this area, the SEEP Network’s Youth and Financial Services Working Group commissioned and wrote four Promising Practices Briefs. The topics of the briefs were selected during a series of consultations held with Working Group members in January 2015.
Continue reading
1584 Hits

Incentives, Subsidies, and Complementary Services to Promote Youth Financial Inclusion

This blog originally appeared on The SEEP Network Blogg, co-authored by Jennifer Denomy and Rebecca Hession.

The United Nations Population Fund reports that there are 1.8 billion young people between the ages of 10 and 24, with 89 percent of them residing in the world’s least developed countries (2014). With appropriate knowledge and tools, youth can be financially empowered to access a range of economic opportunities over the course of their lives. Although they represent a large potential market, the integration of youth into the formal financial system is still a relatively new concept in many countries. In order to address these operational issues and explore innovations in this area, the SEEP Network’s Youth and Financial Services Working Group commissioned and wrote four Promising Practices Briefs. The topics of the briefs were selected during a series of consultations held with Working Group members in January 2015.

Continue reading
2170 Hits

Usage and Dormancy of Youth Accounts

This blog originally appeared on The SEEP Network Blog, co-authored by Jennifer Denomy and Rebecca Hession.

The United Nations Population Fund reports that there are 1.8 billion young people between the ages of 10 and 24, with 89 percent of them residing in less-developed countries (2014). With appropriate knowledge and tools, youth can be financially empowered to access economic opportunities in a sustainable manner. Although they represent a large potential market, the integration of youth into the formal financial system is still a relatively new concept in many countries. In order to address these operational issues and explore innovations in this area, the SEEP Network’s Youth and Financial Services Working Group commissioned and wrote four Promising Practices Briefs. The topics of the briefs were selected during a series of consultations held with Working Group members in January 2015.

Continue reading
7721 Hits

Effective Integration of Financial Services into Economic Opportunities Programming for Youth

effective integration diagram
How can financial services be effectively integrated into economic opportunities programming for youth?

The SEEP Network’s Youth and Financial Services Working Group, facilitated by MEDA, recently completed a series of learning documents which highlight promising practices in youth financial services, illustrated by examples from multiple projects and stakeholders. In a series of member consultations, four topics were identified as areas of particular interest:

Integrating youth financial services into economic opportunities programmingUnderstanding usage and dormancy of youth savings accountsUsing incentives, subsidies and complementary services to promote youth financial inclusionUnderstanding the role of parents and families in youth financial inclusion

A learning document was created to explore each topic, with full publications available here: http://www.meda.org/publications/seep-youth-and-financial-services-working-group We will profile each in a blog entry over the coming weeks, starting with today’s topic: integrating financial services for youth into economic opportunities programming.

Continue reading
2483 Hits

Can MEDA’s Approach Reduce Child, Early and Forced Marriage?

earlychildhoodmariage diagram

There are nearly 70 million child brides worldwide and if current trends continue, 142 million more will join them in the coming decade.1 Married adolescent girls are among the most vulnerable groups in society. They face numerous risks, including early pregnancy, higher maternal mortality and heightened risk of domestic violence and sexually transmitted disease. Their future potential and that of their community and nation, are cut short.

Early and forced marriage usually marks the end of a girl’s education, diminishing her long-term opportunities and sentencing her and her children to lifelong hardships. Often isolated to the domestic sphere, married girls may be able to engage in income generating activity, but will have no control over their income, no awareness of market systems, and no buffer for weathering economic shocks.

Continue reading
2868 Hits

Economic Strengthening: Building Assets for Vulnerable Youth in Afghanistan

a1sx2_Thumbnail1_ASF-apprentices-2.jpg
b2ap3_thumbnail_indirect-vs-direct-v2.png
a1sx2_Thumbnail1_ASF-apprentices-at-work.jpg

From 2008 to 2011, MEDA implemented the Afghan Secure Futures project (ASF) in Kabul. ASF focused on improving the lives of as many as 1,000 vulnerable boys, mainly between the ages of 14 and 18, who were living in Kabul and working as apprentices in the construction sector.

Why take an indirect approach?

Many economic strengthening (ES) projects use indirect approaches. Some seek to benefit youth through one of the social units to which they belong, such as their family1. Family-focused projects typically focus on increasing the earnings of children's parents with the assumption that this will be partly spent to benefit children. Seeking to benefit children and younger youth through their workplaces is less common among ES programming.

Continue reading
6526 Hits

One Workplace At A Time

a1sx2_Original4_2014-10-10-06.54.52.jpg
a1sx2_Thumbnail1_OSH-Diagram-EFACE.png
An Overview of MEDA's Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Intervention for Working Youth in Ethiopia

A little under one-third of Ethiopia's population is currently living in extreme poverty[1]. In many of these cases, households withdraw their children from school and put them to work in order to supplement the family income. While the government of Ethiopia has made great effort to element the worst forms of child labor, enforcement of laws and consistent prosecution of violators has not yet reached an ideal level.

To address this gap, MEDA's E-FACE project implements various livelihood strengthening interventions that tackle the issue of child exploitation due to reduced livelihood. E-FACE targets households at-risk of or engaged in the worst forms of child labor in the Ethiopian textile and agriculture sectors, as well as young workers under the age of 18[2].

Continue reading
4119 Hits

Welcome to our blog

YEO Reach

The MEDA Youth Economic Opportunities (YEO) team is pleased to be launching our blog, where we will be sharing our experiences working with young people around the world and our thoughts on current issues in youth development.

What do we do?

For over a decade, MEDA has been developing targeted solutions that support youth in accessing appropriate financial services, securing safe and meaningful employment and becoming entrepreneurs. These youth experience reduced vulnerability, increased economic activity, and enhanced hope for their future.We combine our expertise in technologies, value chains, agribusiness, financial services and gender to bring catalytic assistance to our clients - those marginalized youth populations in poor and fragile states.

Continue reading
4724 Hits