MEDA Blog - Stories from the Field

Exploring the North: Bahir Dar and Lalibela

b2ap3_thumbnail_The-Blue-Nile-Falls-are-no-Niagara-Falls-but-still-was-nice-to-see_20141209-213251_1.jpgb2ap3_thumbnail_The-many-goats-we-encountered-on-our-way-to-the-Falls_20141209-213250_1.jpgTwo weeks ago I went on a weekend trip to Bahir Dar and Lalibela, located in northern Ethiopia. Since I went to the south for work about a month ago, I was excited to see different parts of the country again. While I do like Addis, it does get tiring with lots of people, traffic and pollution. It was refreshing to be in more remote parts of the country, especially with beautiful landscapes and sunsets that you just don't get in the city.

b2ap3_thumbnail_Steph-and-I-in-front-of-the-Portuguese-Bridge_20141209-213253_1.jpgI met up with Steph in Bahir Dar first since she was there for work. We had dinner along Lake Tana that was lit up by the moonlight. The following day we went to see the Blue Nile Falls. Saturdays are market days, so as we drove one hour to the falls, there were lots of people walking with their cattle or goats. We met up with our tour guide who led us on a 1.5 hour hike. Many times we were face-to-face with cows walking on the path on their way to the market. We saw the Portuguese Bridge and the Blue Nile Falls, and then walked back to finish our tour. There were many kids selling scarves and hand-made crafts along our hike, telling us, "Madam, I'll give you a good price." I eventually caved and bought one even though I've already accumulated so many in Addis!

We relaxed for a few hours and then went for dinner along the lake and watched the sunset. In Bahir Dar we took these 3-wheeled scooter-type taxis called "Bajaj's" or "Touk-touk's" – they were super cheap and really easy to use. After dinner we checked out Kuriftu for dessert, along with good talks under a full moon.

The next part of our trip was to Lalibela, a town renowned for its rock-hewn churches that were built in the 12th century. The story goes that King Lalibela sought to create a New Jerusalem for those who could not make a pilgrimage to the Holy Land. The churches were not constructed in a traditional method, rather, they were excavated and carved from the living rock of monolithic blocks. The churches are still used to this day by Orthodox Christians. And now that it is a UNESCO heritage site, tourism has really taken off over the past few years. The landscape in Lalibela reminded me of the Grand Canyon (although I've never been). It's very desert-like with canyons and plateaus all around.

b2ap3_thumbnail_St.-George-Church_20141209-213252_1.jpgAfter resting up, we went to see the churches. It was really amazing to see the churches, inside and out. My favourite was St. George, the church shaped in a cross. We had a really good guide who showed us all 11 churches within 3.5 hours. It was an exhausting tour, as we walked through passages, trenches, and in-and-out of most of the churches.

While it was overall a really good trip, I'm glad to be back in Addis. After a few days of traveling, all you want is the familiarity of your own home and the variety of food options that are available in the city. With about four months left of this internship, I'm hoping to squeeze in a few more trips, to see more of Ethiopia. It really is a beautiful country. I had a few moments throughout this past trip that reminded me that I am very blessed to be here with MEDA and working on a great project that is changing lives.
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