MEDA Blog - Stories from the Field

The Northern Myth

This past week and a half I took holiday to attend weddings, and it was great to catch up with everyone from back home. I come from a small town, so I received numerous questions about the bike trip. Some examples include: “What is your average km per day?” “What were the biggest challenges you faced?” “Where do you go to the washroom?” “Have you seen any wildlife?” Presumptions also arise, “The Prairies are flat,” “Northern Ontario is desolate,” “You must have a support vehicle.”

It’s surprising the angst I had before this trip. One example is how scared I was of Northern Ontario before, and during, the trip up until arriving in the province. I was scared that we wouldn’t find towns, cafes, or any sort of food. Bears, wolves, and moose petrified me. I thought we would be cycling for days without seeing people. I was utterly and completely wrong.

Northern Ontario has been my favorite part of this trip and created many dear memories. I am a proud Canadian and extremely proud to now say I am from Ontario. Coming from the Sandbanks, I personally believed I was spoiled, and I am, but there are many more beaches across Ontario. In Terrace Bay we set up our tents on the beach and swam in Lake Superior. In White River, where Winnie the Pooh originated, we took a five-hour break from cycling to enjoy the sandy beach of White Lake Provincial Park. In Marathon, we camped right on the water. The beauty of Tobermory shocks me. I have pictures on social media, and its beauty blows everyone away. It is a gorgeous, turquoise area on Lake Ontario with caves and cliff jumping. What’s more surprising is that I never knew of Tobermory even though it isn’t that far from me. It took us a month to get across Northern Ontario, and WE ARE STILL HERE. The majority of the time we camped along beaches like these.

There have been a few milestones on this trip: finishing the Rockies, going over Summits, and detouring to Saskatoon, among others. One milestone that was extremely important was arriving in Thunder Bay. This is the halfway mark across Canada, as well as where Terry Fox decided to end his run to fight cancer. When we went to the monument, overlooking the sleeping giant, I was deeply touched and felt a wave of emotions. I had goose bumps on my arms. What Terry Fox did was extraordinary, and I am only getting a glimpse of his trip from this ride. I felt like crying because I was so overwhelmed with emotions standing there and looking at the statue. Another epic achievement for me was going across the Che Cheman Ferry from Manitoulin Island to Tobermory. This signified that the hardest parts of the trip were over, conquering the mountains, facing headwinds (sometimes for days) in the Prairies, and going through the hilly Canadian Shield in Northern Ontario. We took the night ferry at 10pm so that we were able to stay outside and look at the stars while we talked about our accomplishments and how surreal it was that we had made it this far. Now we are headed out East, and there is less than a month left of the trip.

I look forward to its beauty, and I recommend all Ontarians, and the rest of Canadians, to visit North West Ontario and take your time to see it.

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